Shenzhen Flourish Electronic Technology Co.LTD

Home > News > Product News

The Most Regular Audio Video Connectors

TRS

A TRS connector, is an initialism derived from the names of three conducting parts of the plug: Tip, Ring, and Sleeve[1] – hence, TRS.(tip, ring, sleeve) is a common family of connector typically used for analog signals including audio. It is cylindrical in shape, typically with three contacts. It is also called an audio jack, phone jack, phone plug, jack plug. Specific models are known as stereo plug, mini-jack,mini-stereo, headphone jack, tiny telephone connector and Bantum plug

The TRS connector was invented for use in telephone switchboards in the 20th century and is still widely used, both in its original ¼″ (exactly 6.35 mm) size and in miniaturized versions: 3.5 mm (approx. ⅛″) and 2.5 mm (approx. 3/32″).


RCA

An RCA connector, sometimes called a phono connector or cinch connector, The name "RCA" derives from the Radio Corporation of America, which introduced the design by the early 1940s to allow mono phonograph players to be connected to amplifiers.

In the most normal usage, cables have a standard plug on each end, consisting of a central male connector, surrounded by a ring. The ring is often segmented for flexibility. Devices mount the socket (female jack), consisting of a central hole with a ring of metal around it. The ring is slightly smaller in diameter and longer than the ring on the plug, allowing the plug's ring to fit tightly over it. The jack has a small area between the outer and inner rings which is filled with an insulator, typically plastic.

They are often color-coded, yellow for composite video, red for the right channel, and white or black for the left channel of stereo audio. This trio (or pair) of jacks can be found on the back of almost all audio and video equipment.


SCART

SCART (from Syndicat des Constructeurs d'Appareils Radiorécepteurs et Téléviseurs, Radio and Television Receiver Manufacturers' Association) is a French-originated standard and associated 21-pin connector for connecting audio-visual (AV) equipment together. It is also known as Péritel (especially in France, where the term SCART is practically unknown), 21-pin EuroSCART (Sharp's marketing term for an attempt to market the connector in the Asian region), Euroconector[1] or EuroAV. In America, another name for SCART is EIA Multiport (an EIA interface).

In Europe, SCART is the most common method of connecting audio-visual equipment together, and has become a standard connector for such devices (even more so than the phono plug); it is far less common elsewhere in the world.

The SCART system was intended to simplify connecting audio-video equipment (including TVs, VCRs, DVD players and game consoles). To achieve this it gathered all of the analogue signal connections into a single cable with a unique connector that made incorrect connections nearly impossible.

The signals carried by SCART include both composite and RGB (with composite synchronisation) video, stereo audio input/output and digital signalling. The standard was extended at the end of the 1980s to support the new S-Videosignals. In addition, a TV can be awakened from standby mode or switched to video mode through a SCART connector.


Powered by MetInfo 5.3.19 ©2008-2018 www.MetInfo.cn